The 5 best e-readers you can buy

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TL;DR We binge-read novels on several e-readers to find the best ones. A few page turners later, we found that Amazon’s Kindle Oasis is the absolute best e-reader you can buy.

To a bookworm, there is no greater pleasure in life than diving into a good book. Although many people still prefer good old paper books, digital natives and people who travel a lot love their ebooks and e-readers.

E-readers have come a very long way since Amazon’s first Kindle came out in 2007. Amazon still offers the widest range of e-readers, which includes the humble Kindle and the Rolls Royce of e-readers, the Kindle Oasis.

Of course, there are other great e-readers out there from Amazon’s main competitors: Kobo and Barnes & Noble.

We’ve tested all the latest e-readers to find out which ones are best for all kinds of buyers. Whether you love page-turning buttons, enjoy reading in the bath, or just want a nice cheap e-reader, there’s an e-reader for you in our buying guide.

Note that all Kindles come in two versions: with special offers and without. If you choose the ones with special offers, you will see ads on the lock screen and potentially elsewhere, but you will save money.

The Kindle Oasis may be our top pick, but for various reasons laid out in the slides below, you should also consider the Kobo Aura One, Amazon’s Kindle Paperwhite, the Barnes & Noble Glowlight Plus, and Amazon’s cheapest Kindle.

Author: Malarie Gokey
Twitter: @MalarieGokey
Source: http://uk.businessinsider.com

Auburn Public Library launching Cloud Library program, working to expand offerings

58e1ce0d085f9.image.jpgThe Auburn Public Library is launching a new platform for its ebook and audiobook selection and is hoping to expand its offerings.

The library today uses OverDrive to offer cardholders ebooks and downloadable audiobooks. Patrons can access the books through a separate website and read or listen to them on most devices.

Over the next few weeks, the library will work to switch its collection over to Cloud Library, which will allow the library to offer econtent directly from the library’s site, alongside print content.

“Then they will be able to checkout and download directly from there without having to go back and forth,” said Brandon Rowland, digital services specialist. “It’s a really simple process, and you get to see everything we have to offer at once.”

Cloud Library will work in concert with the library’s new self-checkout system. When patrons use the system to checkout a book, they will also be prompted to download the corresponding ebook or audiobook.

Once the programs transition, the library’s entire catalog will be available in e-book or audiobook format. Rowland also hopes to expand the collection in the transition. Cloud Library will offer the library more purchase options for ebook or audiobook licenses, hopefully allowing them to offer more copies of back listed books, Rowland said.

Patrons using OverDrive will need to switch to the Cloud Drive app, which allows readers to read from their computers, smartphones and tablets. The app is available on Android devices, Apple devices, Nook tablets and Kindle Fire tablets. It will not work with basic e-readers.

The library first began looking into Cloud Library when planning began for the upcoming self-checkout project, said Library Director Chris Warren. More than 25,000 ebooks, downloadable audiobooks and digital magazines were borrowed last year, and Warren recognizes that the numbers are not dwindling.

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“We’re very aware that it’s a growing market, and it’s something that our customers demand,” Warren said. “We hope that this will help us fill that demand more easily and more quickly.”

The switch will take place in early May. OverDrive will be discontinued on May 9 and Cloud Library will launch on May 11. All ebook services will be unavailable on May 10.

Library employees are in week four of marking each item in the library’s collection with RFID tags and assigning barcodes to be used with the upcoming self checkout system, Warren said. They initially expected the process to take 10 to 12 weeks, but Warren now expects they will be finished in six to eight weeks.

The self-checkout will begin operation by the end of May, if not sooner, Warren said.

For more information about Cloud Library or the self checkout, visit www.auburnalabama.org/library.

Author: Cynthia Williford
Twitter: @cynthiwilliford
Source: http://www.oanow.com

Young readers ditch eBooks

229965_54_news_hub_192263_656x500.jpegNew figures show that readers are migrating away from eBooks and that physical sales are on the rise again.

More than 360 million books were sold in the UK last year – that’s 2% more than 2015.

While the amount spent by readers increased by 6% – passing the £100m (€115m) mark.

Nielsen data, quoted in The Guardian found that electronic books sales fell by 4% as readers put down their Kindles and iPhones and returned to traditional books.

This was the second year in a row in which electronic sales have fallen.

Sales through brick and mortar shops increased by 7%.

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The report notes that this comes as sales of books aimed at young people have increased – surprisingly these titles have been particularly popular in their physical forms as these digital natives take a break from their devices.

“We are seeing that books are a respite, particularly for young people who are so busy digitally,” Steve Bohme, research director at Nielsen Book Research UK said.

“Over the last few years we have seen a return to favouring print, partly from what is really successful, this year being non-fiction and children’s books,” he continued, adding that a spike in demand for adult colouring books has also contributed to this shift.

Down to Business recently sat down with a panel of independent Irish booksellers – they reported that their sales have been experiencing steady year-on-year increases.

Author: Joseph Conroy
Twitter: @josephconroy
Source: http://www.newstalk.com